August 2019’s Most Downloaded CORE Deposits

rows of bricks

The most downloaded works in CORE in August 2019:

  1. Oscar Martinez-Peñate, El Salvador Sociología General. Book.
  2. Matthew Kirschenbaum, ENGL 479P: BookLab. Syllabus.
  3. Titus Stahl, “What is Immanent Critique?” Article.
  4. Ilana Gershon, “Media Ideologies: An Introduction.” Article.
  5. Hanna de Vries, “Collective nouns.” Book chapter.
  6. Ayesha Majid, “Marketing strategy of Lenovo laptops.” Report.
  7. Shawn Graham, EX FIGLINIS: The Network Dynamics of the Tiber Valley Brick Industry in the Hinterland of Rome. Book.
  8. Cameron Neylon, “Research excellence is a neo-colonial agenda (and what might be done about it).” Book chapter.
  9. Brigitte Fielder, “Animal Humanism: Race, Species, and Affective Kinship in Nineteenth-Century Abolitionism.” Article.
  10. Johann-Mattis List, Pragmatics of Language Evolution. Book.

The Educator’s Guide to Humanities Commons

On Thursday, August 15th, we posted a Twitter thread through the @humcommons Twitter account that detailed the many Humanities Commons tools that educators might find helpful. Since this thread received such a positive response, we decided to also share it as a blog post here for posterity and in case any non-Twitter users might be interested in what it has to offer.

Below is a list of four Humanities Commons tools and resources that educators may find helpful. Continue reading “The Educator’s Guide to Humanities Commons”

Top CORE Deposits of July 2019

many seashells

The most downloaded CORE deposits in July cover diverse topics, from computer science research to the racial politics of music history:

  1. Oscar Martinez-Peñate, El Salvador Sociología General. Book.
  2. Nicholas Rinehart, “Black Beethoven and the Racial Politics of Music History.” Article.
  3. Ayesha Majid, “Marketing strategy of Lenovo laptops.” Report.
  4. Titus Stahl, “What is Immanent Critique?” Article.
  5. Ilana Gershon, “Media Ideologies: An Introduction.” Article.
  6. Hanna de Vries, “Collective nouns.” Book chapter.
  7. Camille Akmut, “An Introduction to Computer Science Research.” Bibliography.
  8. Marlene Manoff, “Archive and Library,” Essay.
  9. David Bawden, “The Dark Side of Information: Overload, Anxiety and Other Paradoxes and Pathologies.” Article.
  10. Brigitte Fielder, “Animal Humanism: Race, Species, and Affective Kinship in Nineteenth-Century Abolitionism.” Article.

June’s Most Downloaded in CORE

wooden path leading to the beach

Top downloads in June 2019 include syllabi, books, white papers, and more:

  1. Oscar Martinez-Peñate, El Salvador Sociología General. Book.
  2. Iris Agmon, “On the Civil Struggle of Academics in Turkey: The Peace Petition Signers.” Article.
  3. Ilana Gershon, “Media Ideologies: An Introduction.” Article.
  4. Titus Stahl, “What is Immanent Critique?” Article.
  5. Ayesha Majid, “Marketing strategy of Lenovo laptops.” Report.
  6. Brian O’Leary and Kevin Hawkins, Exploring Open Access Ebook Usage, ed. Charles Watkinson, Lucy Montgomery, Cameron Neylon, and Katherine Skinner. White paper.
  7. Brigitte Fielder, “Animal Humanism: Race, Species, and Affective Kinship in Nineteenth-Century Abolitionism.” Article.
  8. Justin M Power, Guido W Grimm, and Johann-Mattis List, “Evolutionary Dynamics in the Dispersal of Sign Languages.” Article.
  9. Nicholas Rinehart, “Black Beethoven and the Racial Politics of Music History.” Article.
  10. Sergio Cigada, Études sur le Symbolisme, edited by Marisa Verna. Book.
  11. Alison Booth, Brandon Walsh, Digital Literary Studies Syllabus. Syllabus.
  12. Erika Supria Honisch, Historical Sound Studies Seminar Syllabus. Syllabus.
  13. David Bawden, “The Dark Side of Information: Overload, Anxiety and Other Paradoxes and Pathologies.” Article.
  14. Elton Barker and Joel Christensen, A Beginner’s Guide to Homer. Book.
  15. Isaías Albertin de Moraes, “A Imigração Haitiana para o Brasil: Causas e Desafios.” Article.

May’s Most Downloaded Work in CORE

track with lanes numbered one to six

The most downloaded work in May 2019 included a white paper on open access ebook usage and a digital literary studies syllabus.

  1. Brian O’Leary and Kevin Hawkins, Exploring Open Access Ebook Usage, ed. Charles Watkinson, Lucy Montgomery, Cameron Neylon, and Katherine Skinner. White paper.
  2. Brigitte Fielder, “Animal Humanism: Race, Species, and Affective Kinship in Nineteenth-Century Abolitionism.” Article.
  3. Sergio Cigada, Études sur le Symbolisme, edited by Marisa Verna. Book.
  4. Titus Stahl, “What is Immanent Critique?” Article.
  5. Ilana Gershon, “Media Ideologies: An Introduction.” Article.
  6. Oscar Martinez-Peñate, El Salvador Sociología General. Book.
  7. Nicholas Rinehart, “Black Beethoven and the Racial Politics of Music History.” Article.
  8. Ayesha Majid, “Marketing strategy of Lenovo laptops.” Report.
  9. Alison Booth, Brandon Walsh, Digital Literary Studies Syllabus. Syllabus.
  10. Samuel Moore, Common Struggles: Policy-based vs. Scholar-led Approaches to Open Access in the Humanities. Thesis.

April’s Most Downloaded Work in CORE

bookshelves filled with thin volumes, in front of a window

April’s top CORE downloads include an article on a short story by Hisaye Yamamoto and a sociological book on El Salvador.

  1. Brigitte Fielder, “Animal Humanism: Race, Species, and Affective Kinship in Nineteenth-Century Abolitionism.” Article.
  2. Nicholas Rinehart, “Black Beethoven and the Racial Politics of Music History.” Article.
  3. Oscar Martinez-Peñate, El Salvador Sociología General. Book.
  4. Ilana Gershon, “Media Ideologies: An Introduction.” Article.
  5. Titus Stahl, “What is Immanent Critique?” Article.
  6. Ayesha Majid, “Marketing strategy of Lenovo laptops.” Report.
  7. Sergio Cigada, Études sur le Symbolisme, edited by Marisa Verna. Book.
  8. David Bawden, “The Dark Side of Information: Overload, Anxiety and Other Paradoxes and Pathologies.” Article.
  9. Liam Hogan, Laura McAtackney, Matthew Reilly, “The Irish in the Anglo-Caribbean: Servants or Slaves?” Article.
  10. Cynthia Wu, “Asian American Feminism’s Alliances with Men: Reading Hisaye Yamamoto’s ‘Seventeen Syllables’ as an Antidraft Tract.” Article.

Most Downloaded CORE Deposits in March 2019

a group of red and purple jellyfish

The CORE deposits with the most downloads in March cover topics ranging from Portlandia to collective nouns.

  1. Oscar Martinez-Peñate, El Salvador Sociología General. Book.
  2. Nicholas Rinehart, “Black Beethoven and the Racial Politics of Music History.” Article.
  3. Ayesha Majid, “Marketing strategy of Lenovo laptops.” Report.
  4. Brigitte Fielder, “Animal Humanism: Race, Species, and Affective Kinship in Nineteenth-Century Abolitionism.” Article.
  5. Ilana Gershon, “Media Ideologies: An Introduction.” Article.
  6. Titus Stahl, “What is Immanent Critique?” Article.
  7. Elton Barker and Joel Christensen, A Beginner’s Guide to Homer. Book.
  8. Eleanor Courtemanche, “Satire and the ‘Inevitability Effect’: The Structure of Utopian Fiction from Looking Backward to Portlandia.” Article.
  9. Mansur Khamitov, Matthew Thomson, Xin (Shane) Wang. “How Well Do Consumer-Brand Relationships Drive Customer Brand Loyalty? Generalizations from a Meta-Analysis of Brand Relationship Elasticities.” Article.
  10. Hanna de Vries, “Collective nouns.” Book chapter.

Humanities Commons Groups Month Week 4!

Welcome to week four of the Humanities Commons Group Month! We’re dedicating this time with you to explore groups features, network, and build online community. Each week features a quick challenge (only 5-10 minutes required of your time) to help you familiarize yourself with groups and develop your online presence. As you complete each challenge, share your progress with the larger HC community by tweeting your work to us at @humcommons and using our hashtag, #HCGroups. That way, we can answer questions, direct folks to your work, and keep the conversation going.

If you’ve already missed the first three weeks, never fear! All of our challenges are explained in this blog, so just look back to earlier blog posts to see what you missed.

Week 4 Challenge

Make a new CORE deposit that gets shared to your group(s). Let folks know in the group discussion or via social media!

This challenge lasts from Friday, March 22nd, until Thursday, March 28th. To complete our fourth challenge, first navigate to the Humanities Commons CORE Repository by clicking the Core Repository tab. Once there, click the free button marked Upload Your Work. This will take you to the New CORE Deposit application page. Complete the application by providing all needed information. Near the middle of the form, you will be offered the opportunity to select up to five groups of which you are a member. Your upload will be deposited into the CORE section of the groups you select and members of the groups you list will be notified of your upload.

Once you’ve uploaded the deposit, share your upload with the group by starting a new discussion post in one of your groups (see Challenge 3 for tips on group discussion posts) or sharing it on social media. If you go to your upload’s page, you should see an option to share it on your Facebook or Twitter account. Don’t forget to also share your upload with us via Twitter using our hashtag so we can let our followers know all about your wonderful work!

Week 4 Group Admin Challenge

Advertise your group! Share it via e-mail, social media, in-person conversations, etc.

Take a few minutes this week to spread the word about your group. Maybe create some challenges of your own for members to complete or post a new discussion question and invite your social media followers or colleagues to join in the group activity. Don’t forget to also share your group with us via Twitter using our hashtag so we can help you to spread the word!

Week 3 Solutions

Get stuck last week? Or missed the challenges announcement? Not to worry, you can still complete them this week! Here they are (you can also find them on the blog post dedicated to Week 3), with instructions.

Week 3 Challenge

Post a new discussion post. Let at least three people know about it.

This challenge will last from March 15th to the 21st. To complete our third challenge, first navigate to the Groups area of Humanities Commons by clicking the Groups tab. Find a group you’re already a part of or join a new one and click onto that group’s page. Once there, click on the Discussion tab of the group’s navigation bar (just below the group’s header image). After you’ve reached the Discussion page, click on the green button labeled Create New Topic and type your new post into the text box.  There are many options you can choose to customize this discussion post. For example, you can select to be notified of any follow-up replies by email, or you can choose to post the same comment to multiple groups by using the checklist at the bottom of the page.

Once you’re done typing in your message and selecting from the many options, click the green button labeled Submit. Congrats! Your discussion post should now be live! Share the post with three people by copying and pasting your post’s link to social media. Please also share your new post with us on Twitter so we can share it with our followers!

Week 3 Group Admin Challenge

Show or hide a menu item for members. For example, if your group doesn’t use one of the group features, you can remove it from the menu to decrease clutter!

To complete this challenge, first go to your group’s page. Select Manage from the group’s navigation bar; then, click on the Settings button. Scroll down to see the option to hide or show menu items. Don’t forget to click Save Changes after you’re happy with your selection, or else it won’t be saved.

screenshot of the group admin settings page where one can hide menu items or change the default landing page.

If you ever change your mind about whether you’d like the menu item to be visible or hidden, you can always return to this page and change it back. Read more about these new options for groups in our recent blog post.