May’s Most Downloaded Work in CORE

track with lanes numbered one to six

The most downloaded work in May 2019 included a white paper on open access ebook usage and a digital literary studies syllabus.

  1. Brian O’Leary and Kevin Hawkins, Exploring Open Access Ebook Usage, ed. Charles Watkinson, Lucy Montgomery, Cameron Neylon, and Katherine Skinner. White paper.
  2. Brigitte Fielder, “Animal Humanism: Race, Species, and Affective Kinship in Nineteenth-Century Abolitionism.” Article.
  3. Sergio Cigada, Études sur le Symbolisme, edited by Marisa Verna. Book.
  4. Titus Stahl, “What is Immanent Critique?” Article.
  5. Ilana Gershon, “Media Ideologies: An Introduction.” Article.
  6. Oscar Martinez-Peñate, El Salvador Sociología General. Book.
  7. Nicholas Rinehart, “Black Beethoven and the Racial Politics of Music History.” Article.
  8. Ayesha Majid, “Marketing strategy of Lenovo laptops.” Report.
  9. Alison Booth, Brandon Walsh, Digital Literary Studies Syllabus. Syllabus.
  10. Samuel Moore, Common Struggles: Policy-based vs. Scholar-led Approaches to Open Access in the Humanities. Thesis.

April’s Most Downloaded Work in CORE

bookshelves filled with thin volumes, in front of a window

April’s top CORE downloads include an article on a short story by Hisaye Yamamoto and a sociological book on El Salvador.

  1. Brigitte Fielder, “Animal Humanism: Race, Species, and Affective Kinship in Nineteenth-Century Abolitionism.” Article.
  2. Nicholas Rinehart, “Black Beethoven and the Racial Politics of Music History.” Article.
  3. Oscar Martinez-Peñate, El Salvador Sociología General. Book.
  4. Ilana Gershon, “Media Ideologies: An Introduction.” Article.
  5. Titus Stahl, “What is Immanent Critique?” Article.
  6. Ayesha Majid, “Marketing strategy of Lenovo laptops.” Report.
  7. Sergio Cigada, Études sur le Symbolisme, edited by Marisa Verna. Book.
  8. David Bawden, “The Dark Side of Information: Overload, Anxiety and Other Paradoxes and Pathologies.” Article.
  9. Liam Hogan, Laura McAtackney, Matthew Reilly, “The Irish in the Anglo-Caribbean: Servants or Slaves?” Article.
  10. Cynthia Wu, “Asian American Feminism’s Alliances with Men: Reading Hisaye Yamamoto’s ‘Seventeen Syllables’ as an Antidraft Tract.” Article.

Most Downloaded CORE Deposits in March 2019

a group of red and purple jellyfish

The CORE deposits with the most downloads in March cover topics ranging from Portlandia to collective nouns.

  1. Oscar Martinez-Peñate, El Salvador Sociología General. Book.
  2. Nicholas Rinehart, “Black Beethoven and the Racial Politics of Music History.” Article.
  3. Ayesha Majid, “Marketing strategy of Lenovo laptops.” Report.
  4. Brigitte Fielder, “Animal Humanism: Race, Species, and Affective Kinship in Nineteenth-Century Abolitionism.” Article.
  5. Ilana Gershon, “Media Ideologies: An Introduction.” Article.
  6. Titus Stahl, “What is Immanent Critique?” Article.
  7. Elton Barker and Joel Christensen, A Beginner’s Guide to Homer. Book.
  8. Eleanor Courtemanche, “Satire and the ‘Inevitability Effect’: The Structure of Utopian Fiction from Looking Backward to Portlandia.” Article.
  9. Mansur Khamitov, Matthew Thomson, Xin (Shane) Wang. “How Well Do Consumer-Brand Relationships Drive Customer Brand Loyalty? Generalizations from a Meta-Analysis of Brand Relationship Elasticities.” Article.
  10. Hanna de Vries, “Collective nouns.” Book chapter.

Humanities Commons Groups Month Week 4!

Welcome to week four of the Humanities Commons Group Month! We’re dedicating this time with you to explore groups features, network, and build online community. Each week features a quick challenge (only 5-10 minutes required of your time) to help you familiarize yourself with groups and develop your online presence. As you complete each challenge, share your progress with the larger HC community by tweeting your work to us at @humcommons and using our hashtag, #HCGroups. That way, we can answer questions, direct folks to your work, and keep the conversation going.

If you’ve already missed the first three weeks, never fear! All of our challenges are explained in this blog, so just look back to earlier blog posts to see what you missed.

Week 4 Challenge

Make a new CORE deposit that gets shared to your group(s). Let folks know in the group discussion or via social media!

This challenge lasts from Friday, March 22nd, until Thursday, March 28th. To complete our fourth challenge, first navigate to the Humanities Commons CORE Repository by clicking the Core Repository tab. Once there, click the free button marked Upload Your Work. This will take you to the New CORE Deposit application page. Complete the application by providing all needed information. Near the middle of the form, you will be offered the opportunity to select up to five groups of which you are a member. Your upload will be deposited into the CORE section of the groups you select and members of the groups you list will be notified of your upload.

Once you’ve uploaded the deposit, share your upload with the group by starting a new discussion post in one of your groups (see Challenge 3 for tips on group discussion posts) or sharing it on social media. If you go to your upload’s page, you should see an option to share it on your Facebook or Twitter account. Don’t forget to also share your upload with us via Twitter using our hashtag so we can let our followers know all about your wonderful work!

Week 4 Group Admin Challenge

Advertise your group! Share it via e-mail, social media, in-person conversations, etc.

Take a few minutes this week to spread the word about your group. Maybe create some challenges of your own for members to complete or post a new discussion question and invite your social media followers or colleagues to join in the group activity. Don’t forget to also share your group with us via Twitter using our hashtag so we can help you to spread the word!

Week 3 Solutions

Get stuck last week? Or missed the challenges announcement? Not to worry, you can still complete them this week! Here they are (you can also find them on the blog post dedicated to Week 3), with instructions.

Week 3 Challenge

Post a new discussion post. Let at least three people know about it.

This challenge will last from March 15th to the 21st. To complete our third challenge, first navigate to the Groups area of Humanities Commons by clicking the Groups tab. Find a group you’re already a part of or join a new one and click onto that group’s page. Once there, click on the Discussion tab of the group’s navigation bar (just below the group’s header image). After you’ve reached the Discussion page, click on the green button labeled Create New Topic and type your new post into the text box.  There are many options you can choose to customize this discussion post. For example, you can select to be notified of any follow-up replies by email, or you can choose to post the same comment to multiple groups by using the checklist at the bottom of the page.

Once you’re done typing in your message and selecting from the many options, click the green button labeled Submit. Congrats! Your discussion post should now be live! Share the post with three people by copying and pasting your post’s link to social media. Please also share your new post with us on Twitter so we can share it with our followers!

Week 3 Group Admin Challenge

Show or hide a menu item for members. For example, if your group doesn’t use one of the group features, you can remove it from the menu to decrease clutter!

To complete this challenge, first go to your group’s page. Select Manage from the group’s navigation bar; then, click on the Settings button. Scroll down to see the option to hide or show menu items. Don’t forget to click Save Changes after you’re happy with your selection, or else it won’t be saved.

screenshot of the group admin settings page where one can hide menu items or change the default landing page.

If you ever change your mind about whether you’d like the menu item to be visible or hidden, you can always return to this page and change it back. Read more about these new options for groups in our recent blog post.

 

Customize your Groups!

intersecting pedestrian crossings with people walking

We’ve introduced some new options to customize a group’s interface. Group admins now have the option to hide features that aren’t relevant to the group in Manage → Settings.

In addition, group admins can change the default landing page for their group from “Activity,” if they wish.

For instance, if a group wants a place to have discussion and collect syllabi and teaching materials deposited in CORE, the group admin might hide Events, Docs, and Files and make “Discussion” the landing page.

screenshot of the group admin settings page where one can hide menu items or change the default landing page.

Group admins will still see the hidden menu items, greyed out. A group member who is not an admin will not see the greyed out items.

group menu bar with "files" greyed out

Humanities Commons Groups Month Week 3!

Welcome to week three of the Humanities Commons Group Month! We’re dedicating this time with you to explore groups features, network, and build online community. Each week features a quick challenge (only 5-10 minutes required of your time) to help you familiarize yourself with groups and develop your online presence. As you complete each challenge, share your progress with the larger HC community by tweeting your work to us at @humcommons and using our hashtag, #HCGroups. That way, we can answer questions, direct folks to your work, and keep the conversation going.

If you’ve already missed the first two weeks, never fear! All of our challenges are explained in this blog, so just look back to early blog posts to see what you missed.

Week 3 Challenge

Post a new discussion post. Let at least three people know about it.

This challenge will last from March 15th to the 21st. To complete our third challenge, first navigate to the Groups area of Humanities Commons by clicking the Groups tab. Find a group you’re already a part of or join a new one and click onto that group’s page. Once there, click on the Discussion tab of the group’s navigation bar (just below the group’s header image). After you’ve reached the Discussion page, click on the green button labeled Create New Topic and type your new post into the text box.  There are many options you can choose to customize this discussion post. For example, you can select to be notified of any follow-up replies by email, or you can choose to post the same comment to multiple groups by using the checklist at the bottom of the page.

Once you’re done typing in your message and selecting from the many options, click the green button labeled Submit. Congrats! Your discussion post should now be live! Share the post with three people by copying and pasting your post’s link to social media. Please also share your new post with us on Twitter so we can share it with our followers!

 

Week 3 Group Admin Challenge

Show or hide a menu item for members. For example, if your group doesn’t use one of the group features, you can remove it from the menu to decrease clutter!

To complete this challenge, first go to your group’s page. Select Manage from the group’s navigation bar; then, click on the Settings button. Scroll down to see the option to hide or show menu items. Don’t forget to click Save Changes after you’re happy with your selection, or else it won’t be saved.

screenshot of the group admin settings page where one can hide menu items or change the default landing page.

If you ever change your mind about whether you’d like the menu item to be visible or hidden, you can always return to this page and change it back. Read more about these new options for groups in our recent blog post.

Week 2 Solutions

Get stuck last week? Or missed the challenges announcement? Not to worry, you can still complete them this week! Here they are (you can also find them on the blog post dedicated to Week 2), with instructions.

Week 2 Challenge

Respond to a discussion post that somebody else began.

To complete this challenge, navigate to the Groups area of Humanities Commons, and either find a group you’re already a part of or join a new one. Once you’re in the group, click on the Discussion tab of the navigation bar (by default, it’s right next to Activity, the main page for most groups). Once there, respond to one of the discussion topics! Or, if there aren’t any, make a discussion topic of your own (that’s jumping ahead a bit to week 3, but you won’t lose points, promise!). Topics can be anything related to the group’s purpose: a pressing issue in a given field, a call for papers, an announcement of a major publication, etc.

Week 2 Group Admin Challenge

Change the group photo or cover image. If you like the one you already have, feel free to switch it back!

To complete this challenge, navigate to a group that you are an administrator for. Next, click Manage in the navigation bar. Once on the Manage page, you can click on Photo or Cover Image in order to change these elements of your group. Do the process again to change it back to the old Photo/Cover Image!

Humanities Commons Groups Month Week 2!

We are now in week two of Humanities Commons Groups Month, a month dedicated to groups features, sharing work, networking, and building community. Each week features a quick challenge (only 5-10 minutes!) to familiarize you with groups and develop your online presence at the same time. Once you complete the challenge, share your progress with everyone with #HCGroups and tagging @humcommons! That way we can answer questions, direct folks to your work, and keep the conversation going.

Week 2 Challenge

Respond to a discussion post that somebody else began.

To complete this challenge, navigate to the Groups area of Humanities Commons, and either find a group you’re already a part of or join a new one. Once you’re in the group, click on the Discussion tab of the navigation bar (by default, it’s right next to Activity, the main page for most groups). Once there, respond to one of the discussion topics! Or, if there aren’t any, make a discussion topic of your own (that’s jumping ahead a bit to week 3, but you won’t lose points, promise!). Topics can be anything related to the group’s purpose: a pressing issue in a given field, a call for papers, an announcement of a major publication, etc.

Week 2 Group Admin Challenge

Change the group photo or cover image. If you like the one you already have, feel free to switch it back!

To complete this challenge, navigate to a group that you are an administrator for. Next, click Manage in the navigation bar. Once on the Manage page, you can click on Photo or Cover Image in order to change these elements of your group. Do the process again to change it back to the old Photo/Cover Image!

Week 1 Solutions

Get stuck last week? Or missed the challenges announcement? Not to worry, you can still complete them this week! Here they are, with instructions.

Invite three new members to a group.

Navigate to one of your groups. Check to see if you have the Send Invites menu item. (Group admins can limit who has the option to send invites, so you may not see it on all groups.) From the Send Invites page, you can invite existing Humanities Commons members to join the group.

The Send Invites screen

Alternatively, as long as the group is not a hidden group, you could send potential group members a link to the group via the Commons, e-mail, or social media.

Group Admin Challenge: Set a welcome message for your group that all new members will receive.

Navigate to a group where you are an administrator. Once there, click Manage on the navigation bar. Next, click the Email Options button. On that page, you can set a welcome e-mail that will go out to all new members who join your group!

Introducing Humanities Commons Groups Month

In March 2019, Humanities Commons will host HC Groups Month by posting various challenges and encouraging tips on our Twitter account, @humcommons. By the end of the month, participants will have a better understanding of how they can take full advantage of the many benefits that HC groups offer.

Why should you take part in HC Groups Month?

Groups are an important feature of Humanities Commons because of their incredible networking potential. By participating in HC Groups Month, you’ll not only learn how to better utilize HC groups, you’ll put your learning to work immediately. This means that your work within the challenges will work for you: you’ll grow your digital network and hopefully make vital connections with other scholars in your field. This can help you grow your digital presence and share your work with a wider audience.

While building your network on HC groups, you’ll find many other benefits:

  • Find support for your work. Each HC group has a “documents” feature, which allows you to share and co-edit documents. This is a great way to ask for feedback on work-in-progress. Additionally, HC users can choose to share their CORE uploads with specific groups. Once shared, you can again ask for feedback, or simply sit back and bask in the knowledge that your work will receive a larger readership than had you not shared it with a group or uploaded it to CORE.
  • Fruitful discussions had at conferences no longer have to end there. You can create a group for a specific conference or society, allowing you to continue conversations held at conferences and share presentations and papers. This will also allow other scholars who were unable to attend the conference to read the work presented and take part in these important discussions.
  • Find the right type of group for you. Each group fulfills a specific purpose for a specific group of people. For example, you might want to support a particular network that currently has very little digital presence. Or, you may want to create a group for one of the courses you’re teaching or a workshop you’re leading. You might also want to create a group for a society or organization. HC allows group creators and members a number of personalization options. As a creator, you decide how public your group will be. As a member, you are in control of how many notifications and/or emails you receive from the group.
  • Enjoy advantages from the listserv model. During our opening Twitter chat announcing HC Groups Month, one HC user mentioned how much she enjoyed using HC groups over listervs because of the streamlined discussions and searchability of HC groups. It can be difficult to locate past conversations hosted in an emailed listserv; however, on HC groups, all discussions are easily located and neatly archived. Similarly, all documents and CORE uploads shared with HC groups are easy to find. By shifting your conversations from a listserv to an HC group, you won’t even lose your ability to post by email: group members can conveniently post discussion topics and replies by sending an email.

Ready for HC Groups Month?

Us, too! We look forward to hosting you on Twitter as we work through our groups-based challenges. Our calendar is below:

WEEK 1 (March 1-7): Invite 3 new members to a group you’re in.

WEEK 2 (March 8-14): Respond to a discussion post that somebody else began.

WEEK 3 (March 15-21): Post a new discussion post. Let at least 3 people know about it.

WEEK 4 (March 22-28): Make a new CORE deposit that gets shared to your group(s). Let folks know, in the group discussion or via social media!

End of Month (March 29-31): Help us add to our list of best practices for generating participation in groups. 

As you complete the challenges, share your progress! If you’re on Twitter, tweet with #HCGroups.

Extra! Group Admin Challenges

If you are already a group admin, or want to become one with a new group of your own, here are some extra challenges for admins!

WEEK 1 (March 1-7): Set a welcome message for your group that all new members will receive.

WEEK 2 (March 8-14): Change the group photo or cover image. If you like the one you already have, feel free to switch it back!

WEEK 3 (March 15-21): Show or hide a menu item for members. For example, if your group doesn’t use one of the group features, you can remove it from the menu to decrease clutter!

WEEK 4 (March 22-28): Advertise your group! Share it via e-mail, social media, in-person conversations, etc.

End of Month (March 29-31): Help us add to our list of best practices for generating participation in groups.

HC Groups Month begins on Friday, March 1st. Be sure to follow us on Twitter (@humcommons) so you don’t miss out on anything. Give us a shout out using our hashtag, #HCGroups, so we know you’re ready to grow your digital network using HC groups!

February’s Most Downloaded CORE Deposits

aerial view of a basketball court

The most downloaded CORE deposits in February 2019 included work on Beethoven, Homer, and Arundhati Roy:

  1. Nicholas Rinehart, “Black Beethoven and the Racial Politics of Music History.” Article.
  2. Oscar Martinez-Peñate, El Salvador Sociología General. Book.
  3. Nikos Tsivikis, “Πού πάνε οι πόλεις όταν εξαφανίζονται; Ο οικισμός της πρώιμης και μέσης βυζαντινής Μεσσήνης.” Conference proceeding.
  4. Luís Henriques, “A atividade litúrgico-musical da ermida de Nossa Senhora dos Remédios: Expressão de uma identidade nobiliárquica da cidade de Angra nos séculos XVI e XVII.” Article.
  5. Elton Barker and Joel Christensen, A Beginner’s Guide to Homer. Book.
  6. Rita Felski, Introduction to Critical and Postcritical Reading. Syllabus.
  7. J.P. Alperin , C. Muñoz Nieves, L. Schimanski, G.E. Fischman, M.T. Niles & E.C. McKiernan. “How significant are the public dimensions of faculty work in review, promotion, and tenure documents?” Article.
  8. Hanna de Vries, “Collective nouns.” Book chapter.
  9. Shazia Sadaf, “Colour Play in Arundhati Roy’s The God of Small Things.” Article.

And tied for tenth: