CORE’s Most Downloaded in 2018

Plato, Seneca, and Aristotle in an illustration from a medieval manuscript, Devotional and Philosophical Writings.

Happy new year! From infographics to books, here are CORE’s most downloaded works in 2018:

  1. Ayesha Majid, “Marketing strategy of Lenovo laptops.” Report.
  2. Oscar Martinez-Peñate, El Salvador Sociología General. Book.
  3. Nicholas Rinehart, “Black Beethoven and the Racial Politics of Music History.” Article.
  4. José Angel García Landa, “Aristotle’s Poetics.” Article.
  5. Titus Stahl, “What is Immanent Critique?” Article.
  6. Geraldine Heng, “The Invention of Race in the European Middle Ages I: Race Studies, Modernity, and the Middle Ages.” Article.
  7. Edith Hall, The Return of Ulysses: A Cultural History of Homer’s Odyssey. Book.
  8. Nicky Agate, Rebecca Kennison, Stacy Konkiel, Christopher P. Long, Jason Rhody, Simone Sacchi, Humanities Values Infographic. Image.
  9. Ilana Gershon, “Media Ideologies: An Introduction.” Article.
  10. J.P. Alperin , C. Muñoz Nieves, L. Schimanski, G.E. Fischman, M.T. Niles & E.C. McKiernan. “How significant are the public dimensions of faculty work in review, promotion, and tenure documents?” Article.

Top CORE deposits in December 2018

photograph of water lilies

The most downloaded work in CORE in December 2018 included articles, a syllabus, and a book, on topics ranging from literature to music history to biblical studies.

  1. Ayesha Majid, “Marketing strategy of Lenovo laptops.” Report.
  2. Nicholas Rinehart, “Black Beethoven and the Racial Politics of Music History.” Article.
  3. Oscar Martinez-Peñate, El Salvador Sociología General. Book.
  4. Shazia Sadaf, “Colour Play in Arundhati Roy’s The God of Small Things.” Article.
  5. Titus Stahl, “What is Immanent Critique?” Article.
  6. Ilana Gershon, “Media Ideologies: An Introduction.” Article.
  7. Corine Tachtiris, Race, Gender, and Sexuality in Translation. Syllabus.
  8. Brigitte Fielder, “Animal Humanism: Race, Species, and Affective Kinship in Nineteenth-Century Abolitionism.” Article.
  9. Victoria Addis, “The Musicalization of Graphic Narratives and P. Craig Russell’s Graphic Novel Operas, The Magic Flute and Salome.” Article.
  10. David Armitage, “Detaching the Census: An Alternative Reading of Luke 2:1-7.” Article.

Groups Best Practices

Making the Most of Your Humanities Commons Group

Once you’ve created a group on Humanities Commons, you may find yourself asking a number of questions:

  • What do I do next?
  • How do I get people do join my group?
  • How do groups promote exciting academic activity and collaboration?
  • How do I encourage members to post more?
  • What else can I do with my group besides sharing CFPs and CORE deposits?

To help you answer these questions and make the most of your Humanities Commons group, we’ve compiled a list of best practices for group moderators. Please be sure to first visit the collection of pages within our groups guide and FAQ. Each of these pages outlines the basic instructions and features for using our groups.

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HC User Spotlight: Kendra Leonard

Humanities Commons member Kendra Leonard is the Executive Director of the Silent Film Sound and Music Archive, as well as a musicologist and music theorist. Kendra designs and maintains a personal site and two project sites on Humanities Commons: Spirit Films and Shakespeare in Early Film. She was kind enough to answer a few of my questions, not only about her project sites but also about her own experience in working on Humanities Commons. 

Spirit Films features Kendra’s book that was reviewed on the site using Open Peer Review. Currently, the project site provides additional information via links and embedded Youtube videos.

Shakespeare in Early Film collects digital materials relating to Shakespearean film adaptations from 1895 to 1929, including still photographs of actors, music, advertising campaigns, and reviews. Teaching resources will also soon be available!

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November 2018: Top CORE Downloads

A snowy mountainside.

The most downloaded work in CORE in November 2018 covered topics ranging from the abominable snowman to Led Zeppelin:

  1. Ayesha Majid, “Marketing strategy of Lenovo laptops.” Report.
  2. Oscar Martinez-Peñate, El Salvador Sociología General. Book.
  3. Nicholas Rinehart, “Black Beethoven and the Racial Politics of Music History.” Article.
  4. Titus Stahl, “What is Immanent Critique?” Article.
  5. Brigitte Fielder, “Animal Humanism: Race, Species, and Affective Kinship in Nineteenth-Century Abolitionism.” Article.
  6. Gregory Afinogenov and Carolin Roeder, “Cold War Creatures: Soviet Science and the Problem of the Abominable Snowman.” Book chapter.
  7. Ilana Gershon, “Media Ideologies: An Introduction.” Article.
  8. John Brackett, “Examining Rhythmic and Metric Practices in Led Zeppelin’s Musical Style.” Article.
  9. Shirin A. Khanmohamadi, “The Look of Medieval Ethnography: William of Rubruck’s Mission to Mongolia.” Article.
  10. Michael Bryson, Love and its Critics: From the Song of Songs to Shakespeare and Milton’s Eden. Book.

HC User Spotlight: Daniela Avido

 

Humanities Commons member Daniela N. Ávido designed and maintains Fauna 3D and was kind enough to answer a few of my questions, not only about the project, but also about her own experience and advice about working on Humanities Commons. 

 Fauna 3D is the public face of a project, “Generation and utilization of 3D models for the study of archaeofaunas,” directed by Marcelo Vitores, which was accredited by Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA), where Daniela is a student. Actually, all the members of the team are either graduates from or students at UBA. The purpose of the project was to experiment with free-open-source software for creating virtual replicas of bones from reference collections (which are used to ID bone fragments from archaeological sites).

If you would like to contact Daniela, or the team behind Fauna 3D, you can do so through her Humanities Commons profile, or via @danavido on Twitter.

3d mesh of a bone in the reference collection, being processed with Regard3D

Continue reading “HC User Spotlight: Daniela Avido”

CORE’s Most Downloaded in October 2018

Painting by Master of Frankfurt, Festival of the Archers, 1493. An outdoor festival scene.

October’s most downloaded CORE deposits include articles, books, and a dissertation:

  1. J.P. Alperin , C. Muñoz Nieves, L. Schimanski, G.E. Fischman, M.T. Niles & E.C. McKiernan. “How significant are the public dimensions of faculty work in review, promotion, and tenure documents?” Article.
  2. Ayesha Majid, “Marketing strategy of Lenovo laptops.” Report.
  3. Oscar Martinez-Peñate, El Salvador Sociología General. Book.
  4. Nicholas Rinehart, “Black Beethoven and the Racial Politics of Music History.” Article.
  5. Titus Stahl, “What is Immanent Critique?” Article.
  6. Luís Henriques, “A nova capela-mor setecentista da Catedral de Évora: Uma abordagem ao seu impacto na atividade musical de Pedro Vaz Rego e Ignácio António Celestino.” Article.
  7. Geraldine Heng, “The Invention of Race in the European Middle Ages I: Race Studies, Modernity, and the Middle Ages.” Article.
  8. M. Selim Yavuz, Dead is dead: Perspectives on the Meaning of Death in Depressive Suicidal Black Metal Music through Musical Representations. Dissertation.
  9. Michael Bryson, Love and its Critics: From the Song of Songs to Shakespeare and Milton’s Eden. Book.
  10. Brigitte Fielder, “Animal Humanism: Race, Species, and Affective Kinship in Nineteenth-Century Abolitionism.” Article.

Humanities Commons Celebrates Open Access Week (October 22-28, 2018)

In celebration of Open Access Week this year, Humanities Commons is hosting five days of open access treats (no tricks!) on HC and on Twitter. We encourage all of our followers and members to tweet along with us by using our hashtag, #HCOAWeek and the official Open Access Week hashtag, #OAWeek. Check out our schedule of treats below.

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Top CORE Downloads in September 2018

A close up of a red and black electric guitar.

The top CORE downloads last month include a syllabus, a conference paper, books, and articles:

  1. Oscar Martinez-Peñate, El Salvador Sociología General. Book.
  2. Ayesha Majid, “Marketing strategy of Lenovo laptops.” Report.
  3. Nicholas Rinehart, “Black Beethoven and the Racial Politics of Music History.” Article.
  4. Linda Shaver-Gleason, “When #TimesUp for Musical Gods: The James Levine Scandal.” Conference paper.
  5. Geraldine Heng, “The Invention of Race in the European Middle Ages I: Race Studies, Modernity, and the Middle Ages.” Article.
  6. Moshe Blidstein, Purity, Community and Ritual in Early Christian Literature.  Table of contents, introduction, and conclusion of book.
  7. James McElvenny, “Ogden and Richards’ The Meaning of Meaning and Early Analytic Philosophy.” Article.
  8. John Brackett, “Examining Rhythmic and Metric Practices in Led Zeppelin’s Musical Style.” Article.
  9. Ilana Gershon, “Media Ideologies: An Introduction.” Article.

and tied for tenth:

HC User Spotlight: Lisa L. Tyler

I was recently fortunate enough to ask Dr. Lisa L. Tyler a number of questions regarding her digital project (Virtual Hemingwayas well as her experience as a member of Humanities Commons. Tyler is a professor of English at Sinclair Community College, where she teaches literature, composition, and business communication. Her research interests include modernist literature and intertextual connections between Ernest Hemingway’s fiction and novels by female authors. Tyler was also a major participant in the recent Humanities Commons digital summer camp, where she shared her thoughts, discoveries, and challenges. I was especially interested to learn more about Tyler’s Virtual Hemingway, a digital project that houses links to over 500 Hemingway-related online sources.

Continue reading “HC User Spotlight: Lisa L. Tyler”